Drink to Your Health with Delicious Tea

Derived from the plant Camellia sinensis, true teas—black, green, oolong, dark and white—are well known for their health benefits. Throughout its nearly 5,000-year history, tea from the Camellia sinensis plant has been believed to help purify the body and preserve the mind. The earliest record of tea’s restorative power dates back to China in 2737 BC.1

Scientists have been testing these theories for decades. To date, researchers have identified and classified the bioactive compounds inherent in tea and thousands of published studies support tea’s ancient health claims. Bioactive compounds that promote health include polyphenolic compounds such as catechins, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), L-theanine, theaflavins, tannins and flavonoids, as well as amino acids, caffeine, lignins and xanthins. Black and green teas are rich sources of phytonutrients, which are responsible for some of their health benefits.2

Tea has been shown to have both short and long-term health benefits for Active Wellness.

  • The antioxidants in true teas are thought to play a role in protecting brain cells and inhibiting oxidative damage. Tea polyphenols are reportedly bioavailable to the brain and may protect neurological function. When researchers compared non-habitual tea drinkers and routine tea drinkers, the “regulars” were found to have greater functional connectivity strength and suppressed hemispheric asymmetry in their structural network, suggesting that habitual tea drinking has a protective effect on age-related brain decline.3
  • Research suggested there is an association between daily tea consumption and the reduced risk of heart disease.4
  • Additional research suggests that the catechins or bioactive compounds in tea, in combination with caffeine, are responsible for increasing energy usage in tea drinkers. This is believed to help in weight management and research suggests tea consumers have a lower weight and waist circumference.5
  • Antibacterial properties of tea may help protect against cavities and gum disease as well as strengthen tooth enamel. Research has demonstrated that two to three cups of green tea daily may play a role in reducing the risk of gum disease.6
  • Tea may boost bone-building markers and improve muscle mass, both of which may reduce the risk of osteoporosis and fracture.7
  • Whereas high caffeine consumption is believed to be a risk factor for reduced bone mineral density, tea drinking has been linked to higher bone density.8

Matcha green tea is one of the true teas highest in catechins and therefore exceptionally beneficial to overall health. Why not take advantage of our “Three for the Price of Two” sale on Kenzen Ten4® Energy Drink Mix made with high-grade organic matcha green tea, organic brown rice solids, organic kiwi and stevia leaf extract!

Sources:

  1. Goggi, Peter. Tea: A Beverage Steeped in History and Health Benefits, Nutraceuticals World, March 2020, pages 38 and 40.
  2. Goggi, Peter. Tea: A Beverage Steeped in History and Health Benefits, Nutraceuticals World, March 2020, pages 38 and 40.
  3. De Bruin EA, etal. Black tea improves attention and self-reported alertness. Appetite, 2011, 56, pages 235-240.
  4. Eng Qy, etal. Molecular understanding of epigallocatechin gallate in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Ethnopharmacology, 2017, 210, pages 296-310.
  5. Hersel R etal. The effects of catechin rich teas and caffeine on energy expenditure and fat oxidation, Obesity Review, 2011 July:12(7):e573-81.
  6. Kushiyama M etal. Relationship between intake of green tea and periodontal disease. Journal Periodontol, 2009, March; 80(3):372-7
  7. Sun K etal, Association between tea consumption and osteoporosis. Medicine, 2017, 96:49 (e9024)
  8. Devine A, etal. Tea drinking is associated with benefits on bone density in older women, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2007: 86(4)1243-7.