Why Iron is so Important to Gut Health

April is recognized as IBS awareness month. IBS stands for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and is a fairly common disease that afflicts between 10 and 15% of the general population in the United States. IBS affects the digestive system and generally causes stomach cramps, bloating, diarrhea, constipation or any combination of symptoms. It’s particularly annoying because the cause may remain unknown and the condition can linger for weeks, months or years.

Evidence is building with researchers that sufferers of IBS may have unhealthy microbiomes—this means their good gut flora (good bacteria) is lacking. When the balance of the gut flora is disturbed, unpleasant gastrointestinal symptoms arise. There are new clues that an ongoing disturbance in gut flora could contribute to the onset of IBS.1

Suffering from both anemia and IBS is relatively common and there is a logical reason behind it.2 Anemia is a common blood disorder where there is a shortage of red blood cells. Anemic people are usually fatigued, because red blood cells are the ones that carry oxygen. There are many types of anemia, but the most common type is due to low iron or low vitamin B12 levels in the blood.

Iron is stored in the body in a protein called ferritin; therefore, monitoring ferritin levels can help prevent iron deficiency. Also, it’s important to know why you have low iron or B12 levels. Oftentimes, it’s because you don’t absorb them well. People with IBS and related digestive problems often have a problem absorbing nutrients since both diarrhea and constipation cause malabsorption.3

Since iron supplements can exacerbate IBS symptoms with increased bloating, constipation and sometimes diarrhea4, natural foods that are high in iron may prove easier on the digestive tract. Plant sources of iron include dark leafy greens, potatoes, tomatoes, lentils, soybeans and nuts. Animal sources of iron include beef, chicken liver and egg yolks. Pescatarian options include tuna, mackerel, clams and oysters.

There is a limited amount of time to absorb iron from food—it’s primarily absorbed in the third of the small intestine known as the duodenum. As food transits past the duodenum, there is still an opportunity for iron absorption but less so.5 Given the short amount of time iron from food can be absorbed, helping its chances of absorption are important. That is precisely where Kenzen Lactoferrin® 2.0 comes in!

Kenzen Lactoferrin 2.0Kenzen Lactoferrin 2.0 is not an iron supplement. As noted by nutritionists and researchers, elemental iron is not only hard to absorb but may actually make IBS symptoms worse. The Lactoferrin 2.0 solution is to help the body to better utilize and balance the iron in the body.* This is accomplished with the special delivery system that Lactoferrin 2.0 provides. Lactoferrin is in fact a protein that binds and transports iron, that is, using the iron that’s already in the body rather than adding external sources of iron.

Consumers of Kenzen Lactoferrin 2.0 are diehard fans for life. Whether you have stomach issues or not, properly absorbing and utilizing the iron in your body is bound to accelerate Active Wellness.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.